eradication

Brodifacoum residues in target and non-target species following an aerial poisoning operation on Motuihe Island, Hauraki Gulf, New Zealand

Aerial poisoning using Talon(R) 7-20 baits (active ingredient 20 ppm brodifacoum) was carried out on Motuihe Island, Hauraki Gulf, during the winter of 1997. The operation aimed to eradicate Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) and house mice (iMus musculus) and to reduce rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) numbers significantly. We studied the diet of feral house cats (Felis earns) before the operation, then monitored the impact of the operation on them to determine whether secondary brodifacoum poisoning caused a reduction in their numbers.

Eradication of Norway Rats (Rattus norvegicus) from Hawea- Island, Fjordland, Using Brodifacoum

Norway rats were eradicated on bush-covered Hawea Island (9 ha) in Breaksea Sound, using the anticoagulant rodenticide "Talon 50 WB" (brodifacoum). The work was done as a conservation measure and to evaluate the feasibility and costs of eradicating rodents quickly from islands. The 50-100 rats present were eradicated in about two weeks by applying a simple strategy that took full account of the characteristics of the poison, he environment, and the behaviour of the target species.

Laboratory rats as trap lures for invasive Norway rats: field trial and recommendations

The Norway rat (Rattus norvegicus) is a highly destructive invasive species but while rat eradications on islands are effective, detection of survivors or reinvasions is challenging. We tested whether laboratory rats can act as lures for wild rats. We live-trapped rats first by using food baits, followed by live trapping using male and female lure rats vs controls (i.e. the same trapping device but without the lure animal). Norway rats were more frequently attracted to lure rats compared with controls. There was no sex bias in the trapped animals.

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