home range

Determining the spacing of acoustic call count stations for monitoring a widespread forest owl

Nocturnal species are challenging to monitor, but with advances in bioacoustic technology, acoustic monitoring is becoming a more affordable, efficient technique for monitoring cryptic species. We tested the suitability of acoustic monitoring as a potential national monitoring method for morepork/rūrū (Ninox novaeseelandiae), in beech forest within the Eglinton Valley, Fiordland, during spring 2009–2010.

Movement and diet of domestic cats on Stewart Island/Rakiura, New Zealand

Domestic cats (Felis catus) in Halfmoon Bay, Stewart Island/Rakiura, were tracked to assess the potential for incursions into native forest around the township, and into Rakiura National Park c. 5 km away. During February and April 2005, 15 and 4 radio-collared cats were tracked, respectively. During a six-month period, cat-owners logged prey brought home by 11 cats. Cats were at home >90% of the time. Of the six cats that left home, movements were small: home range was between 0.05 and 16.6 ha (100% minimum convex polygon).

Lack of movement of stoats (Mustela erminea) between Nothofagus valley floors and alpine grasslands, with implications for the conservation of New Zealand's endangered fauna

Little is known about the movement of stoats in alpine grassland, where several species of native birds, reptiles and invertebrates are potentially at risk from predation. Radio-tracking, live trapping and tracking tunnel techniques were used to sample stoats in two adjacent habitats to determine whether the home range of stoats in beech forest valley floors extends into neighbouring alpine grasslands in the Ettrick Burn Valley, Fiordland.

Summer/autumn movements, mortality rates and density of feral ferrets (Mustela furo) at a farmland site in North Canterbury, New Zealand

For two summer/autumn periods (1999, 2000), we studied the movements and survival of feral ferrets (Mustela furo L.) at a site in North Canterbury that had been previously subjected to intensive control of ferrets. Movement distances of juvenile ferrets from the place of initial to final capture were generally low (median = 1.2 km) though variable [mean = 2.5 ± 1.0(±S.E.M.), range 0.1-21.7 km]. The estimated instantaneous mortality rate of juvenile ferrets was high (mean = 0.8 per year), though imprecise (95% C.I.

Social and spatial structure and range use by Kaimanawa wild horses (Equus caballus : Equidae)

We measured horse density, social structure, habitat use, home ranges and altitudinal micro-climates in the south-western Kaimanawa ranges east of Waiouru, New Zealand. Horse density in the Auahitotara ecological sector averaged 3.6 horses.per km² and ranged from 0.9 to 5.2 horses.per km² within different zones.

Space use and denning behaviour of wild ferrets (Mustela furo) and cats (Felis catus)

We monitored the behaviour of 62 radio-collared ferrets and 25 radio-collared cats in dry, tussock grassland habitat in New Zealand's South Island. The total home range of adult male ferrets (102 ± 58 ha, mean ± 1 s.d.) was marginally greater than that of females (76 ± 48 ha), and averaged 90 ± 55 ha. Male ferret core ranges (27 ± 15 ha) were larger than those of females (16 ± 8 ha). Adult cat home ranges were similar between sexes, and were larger and more variable than those of ferrets (225 ± 209 ha). Core range size of cats was similar between sexes and averaged 54 ± 24 ha.

Ecology of the stoat in Nothofagus forest: Home range, habitat use and diet at different stages of the beech mast cycle

We studied the ecology of a high-density population of stoats in Fiordland, New Zealand, in the summer and autumn of 1990-91 following a Nothofagus seeding in 1990. Results are compared with findings from the same area in 1991-92, a period of lower stoat density. In the high-density year, minimum home ranges (revealed by radio-tracking) of four females averaged 69 ha and those of three males 93 ha; range lengths averaged 1.3 km and 2.5 km respectively. Neither difference was statistically significant.

Ecology of Ship Rats (Rattus rattus) in a Kauri (Agathis australis) Forest in Northland, New Zealand

Home range dimensions and habitat use by ship rats (Rattus rattus) at Puketi, a kauri (Agathis australis) forest in Northland, were examined by live capture and radio-tracking over five weeks in September and October 1993. Home ranges of six females and five males averaged 0.86 ha in area and 174 m in length, with no significant difference in range area or length between males and females. There was substantial overlap in ranges between and within sexes.

Range and Diet of Stoats (Mustela erminea) in a New Zealand Beech Forest

Home range and diet of stoats inhabiting beech forest were examined by trapping and radio-tracking. Eleven stoats (6 female, 5 male) were fitted with radio-transmitters. Minimum home ranges of five females averaged 124 ± 21 ha and of four males 206 ± 73 ha. Range lengths of females averaged 2.3 ± 0.3 km and of males 4.0 ± 0.9 km. These differences were not statistically significant. Adult female stoats appeared to have mutually exclusive home ranges. Two females and one male had home ranges that were bisected by the Eglinton River.

Range Size and Denning Behavior of Brown Kiwi, Apteryx australis mantelli, in Hawkes Bay, New Zealand

Twelve kiwis were radio-tagged and tracked for 12-78 weeks in two sites in Hawke's Bay. Four bonded pairs had ranges of 19.1 to 42.3 ha (estimated by the convex polygon method), which were apparently defended against other kiwis. Two unmated females had ranges of 48.0 and 43.1 ha. Another unmated female occupied a narrow, circular strip, 5.4 km long, covering about 26 ha. The ranges of four kiwis in scrubland and eight in climax beech/podocarp forest were similar in size.

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