1080

Secondary poisoning of stoats after an aerial 1080 poison operation in Pureora Forest, New Zealand

Stoats were monitored by three methods through an aerial 1080 poisoning operation at Waimanoa, Pureora Forest in August 1997. Tracking rates and number of live captures were used as indices of abundance, and radio-transmitters were used to follow individual animals. All 13 stoats with radio-transmitters within the poisoned area died between 2-18 days after the operation. No mustelids were tracked or live-trapped after the operation for three months. Of the radio-tracked stoats that died, rat remains occurred in 67%, passerine birds in 17%, cave weta in 17% and possum in 8%.

Invertebrates feeding on baits used for vertebrate pest control in New Zealand

This study was initiated in response to concerns that vertebrate pest control operations in New Zealand may be having deleterious impacts on invertebrate populations and, secondarily, on insectivorous non-target vertebrate populations. Invertebrates feeding on non-toxic baits of the types used for vertebrate pest control were collected and identified. The bait types were diced carrots and three types of cereal-based baits (No.7, RS5, and AgTech).

The toxicity of sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) to Huberia striata, a New Zealand native ant

Although many species of native invertebrates have been identified on toxic baits containing sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) following aerial operations for possum control, few quantitative data are available to determine the risk of primacy or secondary poisoning that may result from these exposures. This paper reports on a series of studies conducted to determine the risk of 1080 exposure to one such non-target insect, the native ant Huberia striata. Subsequent risk of secondary poisoning to insectivorous animals is extrapolated.

Costs and benefits of aerial 1080 possum control operations using carrot baits to North Island robins (Petroica australis longipes), Pureora Forest Park

Large scale aerial poison operations with 1080-carrot baits are used extensively to control possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) populations in New Zealand forests for ecosystem conservation purposes and to stop the spread of bovine tuberculosis. Although various procedures have been implemented to reduce the incidence of bird kills, dead birds continue to be found after poison operations.

Ecological consequences of toxin use for mammalian pest control in New Zealand—An overview

Toxins, especially sodium monofluoroacetate (1080) and brodifacoum, are widely used throughout New Zealand for control of introduced mammals that are considered pests. This level of toxin use (not necessarily with these toxins) is unlikely to decline for at least 5-10 years. Ecological consequences derive both from mammal population reduction or eradication, and from using toxins as the control method.

The difficulty of reducing introduced wasp (Vespula vulgaris) populations for conservation gains

Introduced common wasps (Vespula vulgaris) are widespread, abundant pests in New Zealand. They compete for food with native birds and feed on native invertebrates. We poisoned wasps annually over 4 years to see if it was possible to reduce their abundance in two 30-ha beech forest sites. Two different poisons (sodium monofluoroacetate and sulfluramid) were used, mixed with sardine catfood. There was no evidence that one poison was more effective than the other.

The Sensitivity of the Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) to 1080 Poison

A knowledge of the sensitivity of the brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) to 1080 poison is important as a basis for planning effective control campaigns. This study assesses the effects that experimental procedure may have on determining the LD50 of 1080 for brushtail possums and reports on the variation in sensitivity within and between different populations of the species in Australia, where it is indigenous. LD50s obtained ranged from 0.39–0.92 mg kg-1, with 95 % confidence limits of from 0.29–1.20 mg kg-1.

Delivery of toxic bait in clusters: a modified technique for aerial poisoning of small mammal pests

Sowing 1080 baits for vertebrate pest control in clusters, rather than evenly, could potentially reduce toxin use. We developed a new technique for aerial delivery of 1080 baits in clusters and, in a set of four trials, compared its efficacy in controlling pests against conventional aerial broadcast baiting. In an initial trial where non-toxic prefeeding was not used (Molesworth Station, North Canterbury) we confirmed that aerial delivery of bait clusters is technically feasible and operationally practical.

Quantifying the benefits of long-term integrated pest control for forest bird populations in a New Zealand temperate rainforest

The control of introduced mammalian predators has become a standard response to protecting the viability of threatened wildlife species on oceanic islands. However, examples of successful outcomes of integrated pest control in forests are few. We investigated the efficacy of a pest control programme in the Landsborough Valley, New Zealand, during 1998–2009, which used continuous trapping to control mustelids and pulsed aerial application of the toxin 1080 to control rats (Rattus spp.) and brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula).

Breeding success of New Zealand falcons (Falco novaeseelandiae) in a pine plantation

Productivity data on the New Zealand falcon (Falco novaeseelandiae) were collected from 87 nest sites in Kaingaroa pine plantation during three breeding seasons, 2003 to 2006. On average, 1.81 chicks were successfully fledged per nest, with young reared successfully at 71% of nests. Breeding occurred between August and March, with most eggs laid before December and most chicks fledged by February. Fifteen percent of nests were depredated, 9% contained eggs that failed to develop and 4% failed owing to forestry operations disturbing or destroying nests.

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