nutrient cycling

Soluble carbon production by honeydew scale insects in a New Zealand beech forest

We estimated the annual production of honeydew per unit land area of beech (Nothofagus spp.) forest by measuring the amount of honeydew produced in 24 h by scale insects (Ultracoelostoma spp.) (Hemiptera: Margarodidae) every month for 2 years. We used exclosures to prevent animals (notably Vespula wasps) removing honeydew, and we compared the standing crop of honeydew inside permanently closed exclosures with that outside exclosures.

Effects of mixed cropping farming systems on changes in soil properties on the Canterbury Plains

Before European settlement, most of the 750,000 ha of land comprising the Canterbury Plains was under native tussock grassland with pockets of podocarp forest. The dominant land use today is mixed cropping in which cereals and cash crops are grown for 2 to 4 years followed by grass-clover pasture for 2 to 4 years. These cropping rotations are generally too short for either a substantial build-up in soil organic matter under pasture or its breakdown under arable cropping to occur.

Influence of Improved Pastures and Grazing Animals on Nutrient Cycling within New Zealand Soils

The improvement of New Zealands pastures over the last 150 years has increased the nutrient status of the soil as a result of the application of fertiliser, an increased soil organic matter content and increased biological activity. The grazing animal has also influenced the nutrient status of the soil by increasing the rate at which nutrients cycle between the soil, plants and animals.