conservation management

Effect of supplementary feeding on reproductive success of hihi (stitchbird, Notiomystis cincta) at a mature forest reintroduction site

Supplementary feeding has proven to be a successful conservation tool for many species, including New Zealand’s hihi (stitchbird, Notiomystis cincta). Previous research has shown supplementary feeding to substantially increase hihi reproductive success at regenerating forest sites, but suggested that it would have reduced benefit in mature forest habitat. Here we report the first direct test of the effect of supplementary feeding on hihi reproductive success in mature forest, using data from the recently reintroduced population at Maungatautari Ecological Island.

Hawkweed invasion does not prevent indigenous non-forest vegetation recovery following grazing removal

Factors controlling vegetation restoration of depleted short-tussock grasslands are poorly understood. We investigated effects of mouse-ear hawkweed (‘hawkweed’, Pilosella officinarum) cover and environmental stress associated with landform and soil type on the rate and pattern of indigenous vegetation recovery from grazing in the highly-modified 1000-ha Lake Tekapo Scientific Reserve in the north of the Upper Waitaki (‘Mackenzie’) Basin. The reserve has been destocked of sheep and under effective rabbit control since 1992.

Habitat complexity and management intensity positively influence fledging success in the endangered hihi (Notiomystis cincta)

Age and structure of local vegetation (habitat complexity) are commonly assumed to be indicators of habitat quality for breeding birds, but for many species these relationships are poorly understood. The hihi (stitchbird Notiomystis cincta),an endangered New Zealand cavity-nesting passerine that only survives on mammalian predator-free islands or within fenced areas, has been the focus of intensive conservation management and research. Between 1992 and 2004 we examined the fledging success of 347 nests from four island populations.

A unified approach to conservation prioritisation, reporting and information gathering in New Zealand

The biodiversity conservation task in New Zealand is considerable and complex, and effective prioritisation of conservation work, informative reporting, and efficient, well-targeted data gathering are essential. We propose an approach to biodiversity assessment for organisations implementing biodiversity conservation work in New Zealand that unifies (1) biodiversity conservation work prioritisation, (2) reporting on trend and difference made to biodiversity, and (3) gathering relevant biodiversity data for both.