stoat

Range and Diet of Stoats (Mustela erminea) in a New Zealand Beech Forest

Home range and diet of stoats inhabiting beech forest were examined by trapping and radio-tracking. Eleven stoats (6 female, 5 male) were fitted with radio-transmitters. Minimum home ranges of five females averaged 124 ± 21 ha and of four males 206 ± 73 ha. Range lengths of females averaged 2.3 ± 0.3 km and of males 4.0 ± 0.9 km. These differences were not statistically significant. Adult female stoats appeared to have mutually exclusive home ranges. Two females and one male had home ranges that were bisected by the Eglinton River.

Change in Diet of Stoats Following Poisoning of Rats in a New- Zealand Forest

The abundance and diet of stoats (Mustela erminea) were compared before and after an aerial 1080-poison operation for possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) in a New Zealand podocarp- hardwood forest. Poisoning dramatically reduced ship rat (Rattus rattus) abundance. Although rats were the main prey item of stoats before the poisoning, stoat abundance was unaffected by the operation and there was a change in stoats' diet from rats to birds. The conservation benefits and risks of undertaking such operations are not clear.

Age-Specific Prevalence and a Possible Transmission Route for Skrjabingylosis in New Zealand Stoats, Mustela erminea

The prevalence of infestation of the skulls of stoats with the parasitic nematode Skrjabingylus nasicola was previously described in a national survey by King and Moody (1982). Since then, more samples from Craigieburn Forest Park and from the Eglinton Valley, Fiordland, have been collected, and a method of determining the actual ages of adult stoats has been developed. The extended samples are here examined for a relationship between infestation and age, which could not previously be tested. Prevalence generally increases with age, significantly so at Craigieburn.

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