Trichosurus vulpecula

Secondary poisoning risk for encapsulated sodium nitrite, a new tool for possum control

Brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) present an ongoing threat to New Zealand’s environment and economy. Research into additional control techniques is vital to ensure that a variety of efficient tools are available to help achieve population suppression. Encapsulated sodium nitrite (NaNO2) has been developed in New Zealand as a new toxin for possum and feral pig (Sus scrofa) control. Its toxic effects at high doses are mediated through the induction of methaemoglobinaemia, a condition in which the carrying capacity of oxygen in red blood cells is reduced.

Dispersal of banana passionfruit (Passiflora tripartita var. mollissima) by exotic mammals in New Zealand facilitates plant invasiveness

Banana passionfruit (Passiflora tripartita var. mollissima) is a noxious vine that is invasive in forest patches in coastal regions throughout New Zealand. We investigated the dispersal mechanisms that facilitate its spread in the Marlborough Sounds. To find out which animals act as dispersers, we monitored tagged fruits in the field. Fruits were removed quickly after ripening.

Optimisation of a microsatellite panel for the individual identification of brushtail possums using low template DNA

The Australian brushtail possum Trichosurus vulpecula is a pervasive marsupial pest of New Zealand. Impacting on the native flora and fauna and the nation’s livestock industry as a vector of bovine tuberculosis, T. vulpecula is a priority for control and eventual eradication. Possum control at present relies on conventional trapping and poisoning methods. Efficient allocation of control depends on accurate quantification of abundance, which could be achieved with the implementation of non-invasive sampling schemes.